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Photo Friday- Toronto’s Architectural Eye Candy

Toronto Architecture

Toronto is one of those cities that draws visitors in to its diverse, sophisticated urban landscape, much like Disney World entices children with its fantastical environment.  Toronto architecture

Toronto architecture

During my first full day in Toronto, I wandered through the maze of skyscrapers with my camera, capturing the artistry of the curves, angles and arches of these magnificent buildings. The sleek modern lines and occasional Gaudi-like waves mixed with the Gothic Revival, industrial, English, and other architectural styles create an interesting urban palate with infinite exploratory photo opportunities.

Toronto architecture

Toronto architecture

Toronto architecture

Toronto architecture

 

Toronto architecture

DSC_4460

Toronto architecture

Toronto architecture

Toronto architecture

Toronto architecture

 

Simcoe WaveDeck at Harbour Square Park

Completed in June 2009, the bridge has a 2.6 meter high wave-like curve. The deck is very popular with the kiddos, as is evident here.

Toronto architecture

Roundhouse Park at the CN Tower

The Roundhouse Park, a 17 acre park and preserved locomotive roundhouse, is home to Toronto’s railway museum and Steam Whistle Brewing company.

Toronto Roundhouse Park

Toronto Roundhouse Park

Toronto Roundhouse Park

Bay and gable architecture is a unique style that developed in Toronto. The prominent features are large bay windows that cover most of the house and a gable (triangular, dual-pitched) roof.

Toronto bay and gable architecture

Toronto architecture

 

Toronto architecture

Queen’s Park

This urban park was opened by Edward, Prince of Wales, in 1860, and named in honor of Queen Victoria. The University of Toronto owns the land and leases it to the government of Ontario (until 2858). Since Ontario’s Legislative Building resides here (housing the Legislative Assembly),  “Queen’s Park” is often a metonym for Ontario’s government.

Toronto architecture

Toronto architecture

Queen's Park

Toronto Queen's Park

Queen's Park

Queen's Park

This building reminded me of one of my favorite apartment buildings in Washington DC. It’s a little art-deco.

Toronto architecture

Queen's Park

St. James Cathedral

Designed by Fredrick William Cumberland, construction on the Gothic Revival architecture started in 1850 and was completed in 1853. In the St. Lawrence neighborhood, it’s only about three blocks from the St. Lawrence Market, one of Toronto’s highlights.

St. James Catherdral

St James Catherdral

The Distillery Historic District

Toronto was built around it’s productive harbor, thus making the harbor areas some of the oldest parts of the city. The industrial complex of the Distillery District, which was once Gooderham and Worts whiskey distillery, represents this architectural style with perfection. It’s a great place to visit and spend the day.  

The Distillery District The Distillery District

HISTORIC Distillery District

Little Trinity

This church, also in the Gothic Revival style, was established in the 1850s  by William Gooderham for his workers at the grist/flour mill.  Little Trinity

Little Trinity

Enoch Turner School House

Enoch Turner, another brewer (and philanthropist), built this one room school 1848. He wanted to educate children in the poor neighborhood surrounding his brewery. It’s now a museum and historic site owned by the Ontario Heritage Trust.

Enoch Turner School House

 

What are your thoughts on Toronto’s architecture? Are there any urban landscapes that impress you?

 

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